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Friday, July 29, 2016

Enter For A Chance To Win Passes To See HELL OR HIGH WATER In PHOENIX

Enter for a chance to see HELL OR HIGH WATER on August 11th at 7:00 PM in PHOENIX.

A story about the collision of the Old and New West, two brothers -- Toby (Chris Pine), a straight-living, divorced father trying to make a better life for his son; and Tanner (Ben Foster), a short-tempered ex-con with a loose trigger finger -- come together to rob branch after branch of the bank that is foreclosing on their family land. The hold-ups are part of a last-ditch scheme to take back a future that powerful forces beyond their control have stolen from under their feet. Vengeance seems to be theirs until they find themselves in the crosshairs of a relentless, foul-mouthed Texas Ranger (Jeff Bridges) looking for one last triumph on the eve of his retirement. As the brothers plot a final bank heist to complete their plan, a showdown looms at the crossroads where the last honest law man and a pair of brothers with nothing to live for except family collide.



See how to enter after the Jump...

"Hell Or High Water" is a modern action drama set in West Texas where the distinction between honest men and outlaws has blurred beyond recognition. Featuring a cast that includes Academy Award®-winner Jeff Bridges ("Crazy Heart," "True Grit"), Chris Pine ("Star Trek," "Into The Woods"), Ben Foster ("3:10 To Yuma," "The Messenger") and Gil Birmingham ("The Lone Ranger," "Twilight"), "Hell Or High Water" is directed by David Mackenzie ("Young Adam," "Starred Up") and written by Taylor Sheridan ("Sicario"), produced by Sidney Kimmel, Peter Berg, Carla Hacken and Julie Yorn and executive produced by Gigi Pritzker, Bill Lischak, Michael Nathanson, Rachel Shane, John Penotti and Bruce Toll.

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NO RECORDING

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY

This screening will be monitored for unauthorized recording. By attending, you agree not to bring any audio and/or visual recording device including laptop computers into the theater and you consent to physical search of your belongings and person have against you. Unauthorized recording will be reported to law enforcement and may subject you to criminal and civil liability (including damages up to $150,000). *This includes, by way of example only, smart phones and your belongings and person for such device. If you attempt to enter with a recording device, you will be denied admission. If you attempt to use a recording device* you consent to your Immediate removal from the theater and forfeiture of the device. Unauthorized recording will be reported to law enforcement and may subject you to criminal and civil liability.

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Movie Review: #JasonBourne

Jason Bourne is a competent but otherwise pedestrian action sequel.

Review by Matt Cummings

When The Bourne Identity exploded into theaters in 2002, one could feel the entire genre shift under them. Reacting to a post-9/11 world of the uber-spy state, we were also treated to a very human story of a man struggling to regain his identity. It re-energized James Bond, while establishing a new plateau for what a smart action film could be. But that feels like 20 years ago, as Jason Bourne results in a competent but utterly pedestrian affair, making us wonder if this series needs a similar bail out.

Struggling to find his way after learning of his former identity, Jason Bourne (Matt Damon) is still tortured by the long list of bodies he's left in the wake. But when his former CIA-turned-ally Nicky (Julia Stiles) decides to release all black-ops data about Treadstone and other programs to the public, Bourne learns that her data includes new information about his father. As CIA director Dewey (Tommy Lee Jones) reacts to the data breach, he enlists the help of the rising young computer star Hall (Alicia Vikander), who realizes that Bourne's supposed bad rap might not what she's been lead to believe. Pursued once again by the agency, Bourne must keep Dewey and his asset (Vincent Cassel) from taking him out, while deciding whether Hall can be trusted, as she makes a daring offer for him to return to the CIA.

It's not that Jason Bourne is boring or poorly made, but it's entirely predictable and fails to engage the audience in a way that reminds us of the original trilogy. It really is more of the same: government finds out the misunderstood Bourne has resurfaced, they send faceless squads of men to eliminate him, a woman collaborates to help him realize questions to his past, and car chases ensue. Tech is used here as breezy plot devices rather than effective eyes that force Bourne out into the open. We react to it like changing one's underwear, and it soon becomes Tech vs Human once again. Moreover, there's no big reveal here, just more of the same and honestly quite less. There's no reasoning behind why Bourne still struggles to live a normal life, and more importantly the story does a poor job of explaining why his current life is so much worse than that of a secret agent. Sure, he's pill popping to stave off worries about what he's done, but there's no mechanism for him to move beyond it.

Moreover, Jason Bourne ruins the opportunity to move the character into a new direction in a frustratingly familiar final scene. In it, Hall attempts to muscle her way into a higher position by essentially blackmailing her boss Russell, while Bourne records all of it leading up to their final meeting. Hall becomes no more than another seedy government-type with more worry about her career than giving Bourne closure. The ending completely foils the chance for Hall to bring Bourne in and elevate her into a sympathetic Control-type character who would send Bourne out on new missions for the CIA. Moreover, I could have imagined Hall being revealed as working to upend Dewey and move Russell into his position ala Kevin Costner's No Way Out. Either would have been far more satisfying, and kept the franchise from falling into peril.

The problem moving forward with this franchise is worth noting. Once a series predicated on unpredictability and slick action scenes, Bourne has become workmanlike, dare I say boring. What made this series so terrific was its quick motions into the grey world of black ops, where agencies actually used assets and logic to work out Bourne's movements and mixing it with those memorable action sequences by Second-Unit DP Dan Bradley Sadly, Director Paul Grengrass elected not to bring Bradley back, and Jason Bourne suffers mightily for it. Moreover, Greengrass and co-writer Christopher Rouse have really painted this series into a corner. Remove the personal journey of discovery and it's just mindless action with some semblance of a spy story woven in as a plot device for the tired action. Hunting Bourne has to end, mostly because he hasn't done anything wrong but also because that storyline is so tired. There is a new bit with Dewey wanting to use a new app by tech genius Aaron Kalloor (Riz Ahmed) to spy on an unsuspecting public, but it's so transparent and one-dimensional that we can see its resolution a mile away.

Damon - for all he and Greengrass did to elevate smart action film to a new level - feels as if he just doesn't have enough to work with here. He's a fantastic actor, but here the great worry he shows throughout the film is well-done but missing the kick at the end. We never learn why Bourne is being hunted (again), although the reveal about his father is interesting until the second act when it's pretty much wiped away. I do like Vikander, but Jones is just doing another version of Gerard from The Fugitive. Dewey has no history with Bourne, and yet he seems ready to hunt him instead of looking to bring him in. Sure, the two have great chemistry, but they're only in one scene and that moment is soon gone. Cassel would have been far more interesting had he been in The Bourne Ultimatum, which is what I feel this one was trying to be. For many fans, the third film was the weakest, mainly due to a merely decent baddie. Here, Cassel is good but way too old; take 10 years off and he's the perfect antagonist.

Once a series that pushed the envelope with paranoid government spycraft and amazing action sequences, Jason Bourne now feels behind the times. Add The Bourne Legacy, and the narrative here has definitely changed. Perhaps it's time for another action series to lift this one out of its monotony, just like Bourne did for Bond. For now, this one is competent and shouldn't offend as you pick popcorn shells from your teeth.

Jason Bourne is rated PG-13 for intense sequences of violence and action, and brief strong language and has a runtime of 123 minutes.

Discuss this review with fellow SJF fans on Facebook. On Twitter, follow us at @SandwichJohnFilms, and follow author Matt Cummings at @mfc90125.
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Movie Review: #BadMoms

Bad Moms is a naughty, nasty, raunchfest that's also one of the best comedies of the year.

Review by Matt Cummings

As we head into the home stretch for the Summer 2016 box office, one thing is abundantly clear: it's been the worst in terms of quality releases as far back as I've been writing about it. Luckily, Bad Moms arrives to make this long list of trash a bit more bearable while establishing itself as potentially the sleeper hit of the year. And yet its message is one that I hope doesn't resonate with stressed out moms ready to party it up at the expense of their children.

For stressed-out mom Amy (Mila Kunis), every day is spent rushing to parent meetings, working full-time hours at her part-time job, and trying to get her husband to actually do some parenting along the way. But when her marriage suddenly ends over a long-time affair, Amy is forced to take on her entitled kids, house, dog, and the pressures of a bake sale headed by bitchy PTA president Gwendolyn (Christina Applegate). Soon, the pressures become too much and Amy finds herself quitting the PTA and drinking in a bar with two other moms: the overly-sensitive Kiki (Kristen Bell) and the scantly-clad loudmouth Carla (Kathryn Hahn). The trio begin to question their roles as parents, and soon find themselves behaving badly (cut to slo-mo gratuitous supermarket scene) while at the same time refusing to make their teenage children breakfast or lunch any longer, while boozing it up and returning to more favored activities like reading the paper and enjoying a quiet breakfast. But when Gwendolyn learns of Amy's 'betrayal' she plots to destroy her child's chance to play soccer, forcing Amy to run against Gwendolyn for PTA president. The results will upend the very nature of what moms do for their children and free Amy's trio to live a more balanced life.

Bad Moms takes on an uncomfortable truth: that years of overly-protecting our children, handing out medals for participation instead of results, and doting them has actually made them soft and entitled. From there, Directors Jon Lucas and Scott Moore wage a war against those children and the moms responsible by pushing Kunis and Bell into literary corners and then giving them a sledgehammer to bash their way out. Luckily, the comedy is so terrific and the chemistry right on that we can forgive any dire underlying message about marriage equality, sexual roles, and "Who's to blame." But consider that perhaps the funniest movie of the year so far - a movie about being perfect parents and the whole "reap what you sow" philosophy - is directed & written not by women but men. That might not mean anything, or it could mean everything depending on how you see the today's world evolving. For Moore and Lucas, the message is right on, even if that is sometimes shouted from the highest roof in multiple directions and times.

Bad Moms is squarely centered around Kunis and her breakdown, but Hahn and Bell deliver great caricature performances of moms we've all had the displeasure of knowing: the one with self-esteem issues and the cougar who doesn't even try to be good until Kiki and Amy show her how the error of her ways. They really do offer three sides to the story, with each one right and wrong in their approaches. Hahn emerges the best here, but Bell is also thoroughly likable; Kunis' Amy is just a little too dour to be placed front and center, mostly because Moore and Lucas don't delve too much into Kiki and Carla's lives. Applegate is great as Gwendolyn, a conniving bitch who actually moves up the food chain with two great scenes at film's end. She too is a mom on the edge, stressed out with the roles inherent i raising children, and her redemption plays extremely well.

Bad Moms doesn't break the mold of either The Hangover or Bridesmaids, sticking to slo-mo shots of milk pouring on the supermarket floor, moms making out, etc. Luckily, the film does find the right time to turn up the joke meter while returning everyone to a sense of normalcy by the end. As Amy delivers a rather dull “I’m not a perfect mother, and that’s OK,” speech during the PTA elections, Moore and Lucas rescue us from the malaise with a hilarious bit in which several moms stand up to admit their parenting errors. And with all of this going on, Bad Moms still succeeds because its underlying message is so craftily assembled. No matter what our children say, they want their parents involved in their lives, from attending baseball games to piano recitals. Whether they need them to be at all of them and whether moms take on too many responsibilities is a subject Bad Moms exceeds at investigating.

And yet, I worry that the message behind Bad Moms is so far out of whack that some lesser moms will treat it as an excuse to be bad, just because Hollywood said it was now OK. I doubt that was the message our creative team meant to hand out with all the laughs, genitals, and bad behavior in the supermarket. And yet with female roles seemingly changing every day, I hope the message moves the pendulum right to where it needs to be: the middle. Perhaps if it didn't also paint men in only three behavioral colors - the coach potato cheater (David Walton), the flighty boss, the gorgeous hunk (Jessie Hernandez) - I might have felt better about its message. No mom (or dad) can be the 'perfect parent,' no matter the money or time one has. As social media continues to place a microscope on every action a parent takes, it becomes increasingly difficult for either side to know what is "fair parenting" or not. If Bad Moms can be criticized for one thing, it's the grenade they throw in the room without sticking around to help parents figure out what to do.

Bad Moms is one of the funniest and unabashedly unforgiving comedies of the past few years. In a male-dominated society which seems to be tipping back to a (necessary) balance, it's refreshing to see an all-female comedy that also doesn't treat men like the newest plague (see The Intern). Hahn ups this film's street cred by turning in one of the best comedic performances in years, even though the movie's message that no mother is truly "good" or perfect is a bit heavy-handed in parts. Let's just hope that moms around the country don't take the wild fun to heart and head out for a bender without at least securing babysitters for their children. I can see that happening, just between you and me.

Bad Moms is rated R for sexual material, full frontal nudity, language throughout, and drug and alcohol content and has a runtime of 101 minutes.

Discuss this review with fellow SJF fans on Facebook. On Twitter, follow us at @SandwichJohnFilms, and follow author Matt Cummings at @mfc90125.
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Movie Review: #CafeSociety

Woody Allen's newest isn't exactly...new. Or worth your time.

Review by Matt Cummings

In the era of modern film - one where gritty violence, sexual dominance, and larger-than-life comic book heroes dominate the theaters, Filmmaker Woody Allen is certainly cut from a cloth that seems to be fading. His most recent affair - the dramedy Café Society - also seems tattered at the edges, an uninspiring story of adulthood and the choices one must live with even when those choices make no sense to the audience for which they're intended.

Set among the palm trees and stars of 1930's Hollywood, Bobby (Jesse Eisenberg) has come from his Jewish home in New York, hoping to find glamour and purpose away from his father's watch business. However, his powerful casting mogul uncle Phil (Steve Carrell) won't give him the time of day, as he's too busy hob-knobbing with stars like Barbara Stanwyck, James and Betty Davis. Eventually Phil relents, giving Bobby a gopher job until he meets his uncle’s secretary Veronica (Kristen Stewart), whom Bobby becomes instantly smitting with. Vonnie, it turns out, is having an affair with the same Phil, who's been happily married for 25 years. But Bobby has no chance with Vonnie, and soon she's with Phil with Bobby returning home to run his brother's night club. As success comes to Bobby and the New year approaches, Vonnie re-emerges into his life, forcing both to reflect on their time together and to consider the unthinkable: a rekindling of their relationship, even though Bobby is now also married and with child.

Café Society is about as bland a film as you're going to get. It's really superficial, which was perhaps Allen's intent, but we don't feel inspired by any of the upper echelon prattling on in a 1930's version of 1st World problems. Moreover, his casting is for the most part a giant swing and miss: Eisenberg, doing his best Woody Allen impersonation, never really connects as anyone other than a giant puppy dog for Stewart's advances. Bobby's Modus Operandi is really to suffer for the LA woman he meets; he and Vonnie #1 never really connect in a way that we either end up rooting for them or feeling sorry for either when their fates are reconciled. Stewart refains from the the trademark eye flutter - but she never seems the right fit for either Bobby or Phil. It really feels that the trio should just find new partners and leave the pining to the movie actors Phil knows so well. The same goes for Vonnie #2, a beautiful but horribly underused Blake Lively as Bobby's wife. In my opinion, Bobby traded up, and yet he's smitten for #1 even as the credits roll.

But more than the only decent acting and script by Allen, it's the feeling that Café Society (and its director) seem horribly dated. It's become more important for him to maintain his once-a-year film output - a promise he's kept since 1982 - than to make a truly meaningful one. That was 2014's Magic in the Moonlight, but there had been a streak of previous losers so long that some had written Allen off entirely when Moonlight arrived. And even though Blue Jasmine brought Cate Blanchett an Oscar, everyone wrote that off to her acumen more than Allen's direction. Much like his characters in Café Society, Allen seems to be coasting on reputation here, suffering from a cast that fails to prop up his diminishing status. We've seen the very good from Carrell (The Big Short) and the awful (Freeheld) and here Phil is neither unlikable or even interesting enough for us to care. His chemistry with Stewart feels more like teacher/student (especially in age) than passionate lovers. In fact, everyone in Café Society seems incredibly bored, even though DP Vittorio Storaro does his best to bathe the screen in pretty browns and well-choreographed dance scenes. But it's not nearly enough.

It's likely that Café Society will make its money, earning Woody Allen yet another opportunity to keep his streak alive, but most likely deny him the credit he thinks he deserves. Hampered by a dull script and an acting troupe clearly not the equal to his previous films, Café Society does very little to hold the general audience's interest. Critics have already buttered up their misplaced affections for this one, so steer clear of it unless you're ready to buy into the hype. It's not what modern film has become, but it's certainly not what we deserve either.

Café Society is rated PG-13 for some violence, a drug reference, suggestive material and smoking and has a runtime of 96 minutes.

Discuss this review with fellow SJF fans on Facebook. On Twitter, follow us at @SandwichJohnFilms, and follow author Matt Cummings at @mfc90125.
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Movie Review: #BatmanTheKillingJoke

Batman: The Killing Joke wastes a golden opportunity to return WB to animation greatness.
WARNING: This review contains major spoilers.

Review by Matt Cummings

As an avid collector of the DC Animated Universe, I've been a little miffed at the many recent changes behind the scenes. With Producer Bruce Timm hitting a homerun with both Batman: The Animated Series and Justice League, his removal in recent years (replacing him with James Tucker) has since left the animated side of DC feeling entirely empty. Replacing familiar voices for (frankly) cheaper ones, the films have suffered as well. So when it was announced that Batman: The Killing Joke would see Timm, Mark Hamill, and Kevin Conroy return, I was excited to see the animated version of The Blues Brothers making a triumphant return. But that's not the case.

Fighting crime in Gotham has let Barbara Gordon/Batgirl (voiced by Tara Carter) a bit flustered. Her boss Bruce Wayne/Batman (Conroy) is demanding and overly protective, refusing to accept her as anything but a hired gun. Soon, their personalities begin to conflict, leading Batgirl to quit. But Batman's greatest enemy The Joker (Hamill) has escaped, and soon Barbara and her father Commissioner Gordon (Ray Rise) are on the receiving end of The Joker's diabolical plans. Realizing that he can no longer simply capture his opponent - for fear of his escape once more - Batman must decide if can cross the line, especially when tragic news of The Joker's exploits hits too close to home.

Simply put, Batman: The Killing Joke is a disappointment. Dominated by poorly-drawn flashbacks of The Joker's origins and a current story with a huge and unnecessary reveal, it was clear that our Fathom Events audience of hardcore Bat fans was more than little stunned. The movie is based on the Alan Moore/Brian Bollard graphic novel, which took the 'relationship' of these two iconic characters to new levels of dark and set the tone for a deeper expansion of the DC universe. But the script by Brian Azzarello makes two critical mistakes: he minimizes The Joker learning about his wife's death and adds a controversial sex scene between the Bats. Yes, a much younger woman has sex with the much older/mentor Batman. There's no reason for it to exist, especially when it does nothing to elevate the story or create any further tension.

Release of this information was highly controversial at this year's San Diego Comic-Con, and with good reason. At least Conroy and Hamill were immediately welcomed back by fans who rightly believe WB should never have severed ties with them. The two are perhaps the most recognized voice actors in the business, and in Joke they once again deliver impressive results. Carter is very good as Batgirl, but Wise isn't as the Commissioner, even though a change was necessary with the death of original voice Bob Hastings. His performance simply sits there, even though he's an amazing live-action actor. It's a shame these elements didn't work, but it does show how important a role that a good script plays in the success of a movie.

In order to extend the story out, we also get a 20-minute 'prologue' of Batgirl being pursued by a pining criminal that's also not connected to any part of the original Joke. It's not really well-executed, more so because of what it turns Barbara into. Here, she's a sexual icon to be worshiped, while she and Batman never have a moment to work out their differences. They never explain why their relationship would turn sexual, or how it would impact Barbara later becoming Oracle. No one really moves outside of their comfort zone, which I guess is good for the core story but not for the prologue.

It's likely that fans are not going to forgive WB Animation for some of the unsettling Batman: The Killing Joke. Hampered by animation that doesn't transfer well to the big screen, as well as shoddy script decisions that adds an unnecessary sexual element, it's a wasted opportunity to bring back the creative core that established DCAU's footprint way back in 1992. Moreover, it makes me worry that the recent voice casting and creative mistakes by the studio are part of a much larger problem. When even your classic A-Team can't make a good movie, it's time to Grapple Gun the hell out.

Batman: The Killing Joke is rated R for some bloody images and disturbing content and has a runtime of 76 minutes. This will not receiving an extended theatrical but will be available on Blu-ray beginning August 2nd.

Discuss this review with fellow SJF fans on Facebook. On Twitter, follow us at @SandwichJohnFilms, and follow author Matt Cummings at @mfc90125.
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Thursday, July 28, 2016

Movie Review: #LightsOut

Lights Out is more rental fodder than a worthwhile theatrical scarefest.

Review by Erika Garcia-Santos

A mentally unstable mother’s deceased childhood friend brings itself back to life through a paranormal phenomenon that leaches off the mother’s illness. The mom, Sophie, has a dark past that includes her friend, Diana, whom she met while admitted to a mental hospital. Diana’s possession and obsession of Sophie bleeds through the afterlife into our world where she will do anything to keep Sophie all to herself. Diana’s reemergence puts Sophie’s children Rebecca and Martin’s lives danger because she is not afraid to get rid of anyone that steals Sophie’s attention.

Lights Out is an extension of Director David F. Sandberg’s short film, “Lights Out,” that was released in 2013 and originally was well received. However, this extended version itself is rather short coming in at under a 90-minute runtime. From the very beginning the viewer can tell they are in for a creepy ride, but what they do not anticipate is the low budget and poorly executed B-level horror flick that unfolds before them. The concept of the film is intriguing and there were several decent “gotcha” moments, but as the story progresses it unravels becoming more and more predictable.

In addition, the acting was terrible performed a mediocre list of C-list actors mainly due to the $5Million shoestring budget that could not afford even a B-list actor to the cast roster. Each character is overly dramatic in their performances including the main character Martin played a young Gabriel Bateman who comes across too wise for his years and eagerly accepting of his crazy mother’s behavior. The other main character Rebecca played by Teresa Palmer, not only looks like a knock-off low budget version of Kristen Stewart but does her best angsty, semi-punk impression of her. The only likeable character in the entire movie is Rebecca’s not-boyfriend-boyfriend Bret played by Alexander DiPersia because he is the smartest of the bunch and *SPOILER* actually goes to the authorities for help instead of trying to handle it himself.

On a positive note, it was refreshing and exciting to see so much of the supernatural spirit, Diana, that haunts Sophie and her family. She is surprisingly in many of the scenes, although you cannot see her in her entirety but unlike many other scary movies the villain/spirit/demon/ghosts are hidden from view so that the audience can come up with their own versions of what scares them to add the most fear and shock value. However, over time the audience becomes almost desensitized to Diana because even though moves in a creepy way and makes fast movements she really is not all that scary. Granted she is ruthless and deranged but by the main climax the main characters are so frustratingly gullible and not really trying to save themselves you almost root for her.

The movie has a handful of well-done cinematic moments that are thought out and executed but it does not make up for the bad acting, messy story, and predictable scares. Do yourself a favor and watch this when it comes out for rental probably just before Halloween. That way you won’t completely waste your money and it might just add to the creepiness-factor watching in your own dark house. Skip this during opening weekend and see Star Trek Beyond instead.

Lights Out is rated PG-13 for terror throughout, violence including disturbing images, some thematic material and brief drug content and has an 81-minute runtime.
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Training Day TV Show Trailer Starring Bill Paxton

A crime thriller that begins 15 years after the events of the feature film left, about an idealistic young police officer (Justin Cornwell) who is appointed to an elite squad of the LAPD where he is partnered with a seasoned, morally ambiguous detective (Bill Paxton). Drew Van Acker, Katrina Law, Lex Scott Davis and Julie Benz will also star. Jerry Bruckheimer, Antoine Fuqua, Jonathan Littman, Will Beall and Barry Schindel will executive-produce.



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New Trailer For The Accountant Starring Ben Affleck

The new trailer for The Accountant, starring Ben Affleck, Anna Kendrick, J.K. Simmons, Jon Bernthal, Jeffrey Tambor, John Lithgow and directed by Gavin O’Connor.



Christian Wolff (Affleck) is a math savant with more affinity for numbers than people. Behind the cover of a small-town CPA office, he works as a freelance accountant for some of the world’s most dangerous criminal organizations. With the Treasury Department’s Crime Enforcement Division, run by Ray King (J.K. Simmons), starting to close in, Christian takes on a legitimate client: a state-of-the-art robotics company where an accounting clerk (Anna Kendrick) has discovered a discrepancy involving millions of dollars. But as Christian uncooks the books and gets closer to the truth, it is the body count that starts to rise.

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The Rocketeer Will Be Either A Reboot Or Sequel

The Rocketeer is one of those movies that found itself sputtering at the box office upon its original 1991 release, but has gone on to be thought of fondly, enjoying cult status and in healthy rotation as a cosplay concept. Now Disney is hoping that translates into success for a reboot/sequel, in development at the studio.

While the movie is still in early development, the Hollywood Reporter has heard that it will re-imagine the character as a black female hero who dons the rocket pack and suit to fight evil. Joe Johnston's original was adapted from Dave Stevens' 1980s comic by Danny Bilson, William Dear and Paul De Meo and starred Billy Campbell as Cliff Secord, a stunt pilot who stumbles across an experimental jet pack and gear and gets mixed up with mobsters, Nazis, Howard Hughes and the FBI. Designed as a throwback to the serials of the 1930s and '40s in the same way that Flash Gordon channelled the genre (perhaps with a smidge less camp), The Rocketeer has long since been boosted into a life of its own, turning it into prime target and an arrow aimed straight at nostalgia.

In the new concept, the story will keep the period setting, but six years after the original film. Secord has vanished while battling Nazis and a new hero, a young, African-American pilot, must take up the Rocketeer mantle to stop an ambitious rocket scientist from stealing the jet pack technology and changing the course of what will become the Cold War. Max Winkler and Matt Spicer are aboard to write the movie, currently known as The Rocketeers.

Disney has yet to release any sort of official statement, nor is there a release set, but if done right, it could introduce a whole new generation to the idea of high-flying adventure and heroics.

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Source-Empire
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Movie Review: #GLEASONMOVIE Review. Most Incredibly Moving Documentary Film.

Incredibly moving.

RAMA delivers another great review.

GLEASON is one of the most incredibly moving documentary films I’ve ever seen. A powerful tale of family and unconditional love. It’s a testament to the resilience of the human spirit. An absolute must-see.

Directed by Clay Tweel, GLEASON is about former NFL athlete; former New Orleans Saints hero/defensive back, Steve Gleason who got diagnosed with ALS and weeks shortly after that, he and his wife, Michel, are pregnant with their first child. The film chronicles the tumultuous years struggling through Steve’s declining physical condition all the while trying to keep it together for their son, Rivers. It’s an intimate portrait of what it feels like to be living with a loved one suffering from this disease, most other spouses would give up, but there’s something strong and inspiring about Steve and Michel’s marriage and parenthood.

I had the privilege of interviewing Steve’s wife, Michel about her experiences not just with this film but going day-to-day taking care of both Steve and Rivers and clearly from the film itself, this is not an easy task. Which is why I already have a mountain of respect for mothers everywhere but specifically for Michel who has to go that extra mile. GLEASON as a documentary, is very raw, very honest, the filmmakers have full access into Steve and Michel’s lives and so what we the audience get is a story that’s authentic and very human. You’ll laugh, you’ll cry, GLEASON can evoke all kinds of emotions because Steve and Michel lay it all down on the table, there’s no hiding it, and despite the difficulties, they manage to go through them with good sense of humor, it doesn’t take a genius to see why these two are made for each other. The film does a good job of raising awareness about ALS especially to some of us audiences who may have been a bit ignorant on the matter, you’ll learn a lot from watching GLEASON but most importantly you’ll learn how far humans can go when we refuse to quit.

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#MondoCon 2016: Tickets On Sale & Artist Lineup

Tickets On Sale Now For "MondoCon: Close Encounters of the Third Con" Featuring Massive Lineup of World Renowned Artists

Mondo is pleased to announce tickets are on sale for the third annual MondoCon along with an initial lineup of exhibitors and artists. MondoCon 2016 will take place October 22nd and 23rd in Austin, TX at AFS Cinema and Holiday Inn Midtown Conference Center.

MondoCon is a celebration of everything Mondo loves, including movies, art, comics, music, toys and food. It's a weekend curated with fans in mind, featuring incredible artists & creators from around the world, panels, screenings, food trucks, live score and interactive events.

The full program schedule will be unveiled in the weeks to come, but Mondo is excited to tease a few items, including a Mondo Gallery show on the eve of MondoCon on Friday, October 21st entitled "New Works" featuring celebrated artists Jason Edmiston and Ken Taylor. Artist Jock will also be in attendance at the convention to sign copies of his new book The Art of Jock.

Mondo has also unveiled a super cool new vinyl for The Monster Squad Original Motion Picture Soundtrack with music composed and conducted by Bruce Broughton. The collectible design features artwork by Gary Pullin. The soundtrack will be available first at MondoCon.

ARISTS & EXHIBITORS IN ATTENDANCE

Martin Ansin Sam Wolfe Connelly Aaron Draplin
Oliver Barrett Rhys Cooper Jason Edmiston
Richey Beckett Daniel Danger Francisco Francavilla
Florian Bermer DKNG Ken Garduno
Scott C Craig Drake JJ Harrison
Tom Haubrick Phil Rameriz Matt Ryan Tobin
Jock JC Richard Kevin Tong
Rob Jones Arik Roper Vacvvm
Alex Kirhzner Jay Ryan WBYK
Landland Scarecrowoven Erica Williams
Mike Mitchell Todd Slater N.C. Winters
Randy Ortiz William Stout Matthew Woodson
Alex Pardee Ken Taylor
Gary Pullin Matt Taylor

Tickets Available Now:
Early Bird 2-Day Tickets, $79. Limited Number Available. On Sale Now.
Saturday-Only: $45, on sale later this summer
Sunday-Only: $45, on sale later this summer

Visit the MondoCon official site for tickets and more info. Follow Mondo on Twitter for additional updates:

Mondo-Con.com
Twitter.com/MondoNews


About MONDO
Mondo is an art gallery and online store devoted to a passionate love of film, art, music and toys. The company has received global recognition for bringing art back to movie poster design and has emerged as one of the leading curators of classic and contemporary film soundtracks on vinyl. Utilizing the talents of world class artists and designers, Mondo produces limited edition, screen printed posters based on film, television and comic properties, working with the leading entertainment brands including DC Comics, HBO, Marvel, Paramount Pictures, Universal Studios, Walt Disney Studios and Warner Brothers as well as filmmakers like Paul Thomas Anderson, Guillermo Del Toro, Zack Snyder, Quentin Tarantino and Edgar Wright. Based in Austin, TX, Mondo operates out of a permanent gallery space, hosting regular exhibitions featuring a blend of breathtaking original artwork and limited edition screen prints. Mondo aspires to be a creative home for artists and designers to work and have their visions realized, whether through posters, gallery shows, vinyl, apparel or toys. Their first convention in 2014, MondoCon, was a celebration of art, music, film and their creators. Mondo is also recognized by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences with a full archive of film posters as part of their research library. The parent company of Mondo is Alamo Drafthouse.

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That Other BEAUTY AND THE BEAST Trailer

Shout! Factory Films is proud to debut the OFFICIAL MOVIE TRAILER for BEAUTY AND THE BEAST (LA BELLE ET LA BÊTE)! Directed by Christophe Gans and starring Vincent Cassel (Jason Bourne) and Lea Seydoux (Spectre), the film follows the unexpected romance between the youngest daughter of a merchant who has fallen on hard times and the mysterious beast to which her father has become indebted. This modern take on a classic fairy tale delivers a vibrant and captivating cinematic adventure not to be missed!



BEAUTY AND THE BEAST (LA BELLE ET LA BÊTE) debuts in select U.S. Theaters on September 23rd.

1810. After the wreck of his ships, a financially-ruined merchant (André Dussollier) exiles himself in the countryside with his six children. Among them is Belle (Léa Seydoux), his youngest daughter, a joyful girl full of grace. One day, during an arduous journey, the merchant stumbles across the magical domain of the Beast (Vincent Cassel), who sentences him to death for stealing a rose. Feeling responsible for the terrible fate which has befallen her family, Belle decides to sacrifice herself and take her father's place. At the Beast's castle, it is not death that awaits Belle, but a strange life in which fantastical moments mingle with gaiety and melancholy. Every night, at dinner, Belle and the Beast sit down together. They learn about each other, taming one another like two strangers who are total opposites. When she has to repulse his amorous advances, Belle tries to pierce the mysteries of the Beast and his domain. And when night falls, the Beast's past is revealed to her bit by bit in her dreams. It is a tragic story, which tells her that this solitary and fearsome being was once a majestic prince. Armed with her courage, ignoring every danger, and opening her heart, Belle manages to release the Beast from his curse. And in doing so, she discovers true love.
#beautyandthebeast

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First Look At Tyler Hoechlin As SUPERMAN In SUPERGIRL

The CW and DC Entertainment have unleashed this first image of actor Tyler Hoechlin as man of steel, Kara’s cousin, Superman in the upcoming season 2 of SUPERGIRL.

SUPERGIRL season 2 premieres Monday, Oct. 10 at 8 p.m. ET on The CW.

Actress Floriana Lima (“The Family”) has been cast in The CW’s Supergirl season 2 in the series regular role of Maggie Sawyer who in the DC comics is gay and when she was first introduced in 1987, she was a captain of the Metropolis Special Crimes unit and a highly skilled member of the Science Police which deals with metahumans. BUT on this show, Floriana Lima’s Maggie Sawyer is a detective for the National City Police department and she’s interested in cases involving aliens

Former Wonder Woman, Lynda Carter, will play the recurring role of the President of The United States on The CW’s “Supergirl” series starring Melissa Benoist as title character. Carter’s character will first show up in the third episode of season 2.

By the way, years ago, Lynda Carter also showed up on The CW’s “Smallville” series.

Tyler Hoechlin will play my favorite superhero, Superman, who was shown only as faceless shadow, silhouette or text messages in previous season when “Supergirl” was on CBS.
Tyler Hoechlin’s Superman will show up in the first two episodes of season 2 which has found its new home on The CW. Kal-El/Clark Kent/Superman will be visiting his cousin Kara Zor-El (Melissa Benoist), in National City.

Ian Gomez plays Snapper Carr who is a newsman hired by Calista Flockhart’s Cat Grant in order to be CatCo Magazine’s editor-in-chief. Carr is the kind of guy who pushes journalists to dig deeper and he’s not afraid to tell them what he thinks of them.

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New Trailer For MASTERMINDS

Inspired by true events, a group of half-brained criminals execute an absurdly faulted heist plan. They manage the impossible and make off with $17 million in cash! MASTERMINDS stars Zach Galifianakis, Owen Wilson, Kristen Wiig, Ken Marino, and Jason Sudeikis, Devin Ratray, Jon Daly, Mary Elizabeth Ellis, Kate McKinnon, and Leslie Jones.



MASTERMINDS hits theaters everywhere on SEPTEMBER 30, 2016!

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New Trailer For #HACKSAWRIDGE

HACKSAW RIDGE is the extraordinary true story of Desmond Doss [Andrew Garfield] who, in Okinawa during the bloodiest battle of WWII, saved 75 men without firing or carrying a gun. He was the only American soldier in WWII to fight on the front lines without a weapon, as he believed that while the war was justified, killing was nevertheless wrong. As an army medic, he single-handedly evacuated the wounded from behind enemy lines, braved fire while tending to soldiers and was wounded by a grenade and hit by snipers. Doss was the first conscientious objector awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor.



Starring Andrew Garfield, Sam Worthington, Luke Bracey, Teresa Palmer, Hugo Weaving, Rachel Griffiths and Vince Vaughn.

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#THEGREATWALL Trailer & Images Starring Matt Damon

The new trailer for Legendary Pictures and Universal Pictures' THE GREAT WALL is here.


Starring global superstar Matt Damon and directed by one of the most breathtaking visual stylists of our time, Zhang Yimou (Hero, House of Flying Daggers), Legendary’s The Great Wall tells the story of an elite force making a valiant stand for humanity on the world’s most iconic structure. The first English-language production for Yimou is the largest film ever shot entirely in China. The Great Wall also stars Jing Tian, Pedro Pascal, Willem Dafoe and Andy Lau.



See all the images after the Jump...











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BLEED FOR THIS Official Poster

BLEED FOR THIS, starring Miles Teller, Aaron Eckhart, Katey Sagal, and Ted Levine. Don't miss this incredible true story of one of the most inspiring and unlikely comebacks in sports history in select theaters November 4th!

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Wednesday, July 27, 2016

Bridget Regan @TheLastShipTNT Comic Con Interview

Here is the round table interview with Bridget Regan that we did at Comic Con 2016 during the TNT's The Last Ship press room.



See all the photos after the Jump...

Regan was added to the cast of the TNT drama series The Last Ship for the show's third season, playing the role of Sasha, a current diplomat in Asia and a former Navy Intelligence Officer. You may have also seen her in John Wick, White Collar, Jane the Virgin and Agent Carter.









She was also comic book fans and critics ideal choice to portray Wonder Woman.

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Movie Review: #Nerve The film has boundless potential with the future-is-now vibe and intriguing story

Read our review to see whether the film lives up to the fast-paced trailer.
Review by Erika Garcia-Santos Venus "Vee" Delmonico, a studious and cautious graduating high school senior decides to take a ride on the wild side by playing a hot new online game called Nerve. During her first round in the game, she finds herself quickly partnered with a stranger and fellow Nerve player, Ian. The two teens team together to complete the increasingly dangerous and intense dares while managing to rack up tons of cash. Soon, the tasks take a turn for the worst as the “Watchers” begin to orchestrate a potentially life altering final round for the two “Players.”
Nerve is a fast paced wild ride that has the viewer clinging to the edge of their seat from nearly the beginning. There is no doubt in my mind that this movie will do well amongst the teens that make their way into the air conditioned theaters to get out of the heat while they kill time this summer. The soundtrack is good and has many different hip hop and EDM stylized music that is “in” this year. The film is stacked with hot actors from Netflix’s Original - Orange is the New Black and the two main characters Emma Roberts and Dave Franco have obvious on screen chemistry. There is a lot that this movie has going for it, but with Nerve you certainly have to take the good with the bad. The acting is subpar at best to say the least. I love Juliette Lewis, but her portrayal of a completely clueless mother is outright laughable. For the entire film she’s wandering around checking her phone as she receives bank updates and ends up calling her daughter’s best friend to get information, which is just as ridiculous as it sounds. The catty behavior between Vee and her other best friend Sydney (played by Emily Meade) is extremely over acted on both sides. In addition to the poor acting, the painfully predictable plot line is almost too much to handle.
The story’s idea is interesting by how the screenwriter, Jessica Sharzer, adapted a young adult novel written by Jeanne Ryan for this summer teen flick. Did you know this was a novel? Neither did I. What is most interesting about the semi-original story-line is how the film addresses the reality of how truly ingrained technology is in our everyday lives to the point that we as a society really do not know nor understand how much personal information is out there on the internet for anyone to find and use against us. The film has boundless potential with the future-is-now vibe and intriguing story, which is well paced but after 2/3 of the way through it loses steam and falls off kilter. The final act of the movie veers far off course and the viewers are standing on the side wondering how we even got to this point in the first place. The subtle undertone of the internet actually being dangerous and anonymity isn’t always the best for society gets pushed the forefront and comes across rather preachy. Then the comically unrealistic hacking to save mankind scene makes anyone that knows even the slightest bit of computer coding shake their head because it’s boringly cliché.
Nerve will certainly make its money back and maybe even gross a little in the box office as parent’s bring their little ones to Finding Dory and the older siblings can escape their parental clutches to hang out with friends and text while in this movie. I certainly hope that the teenagers this film is geared towards will think twice about their desire to start up a crowd funding campaign to build Nerve in real life, because of the realistic dangers it brings. If you are over the age of, let’s say 20 years old, skip this film and rent it on Redbox this fall when all the kiddies are back in school and you can watch it in the comfort of your own home without their bright screened phones lighting up the room. Nerve is rated PG-13 for thematic material involving dangerous and risky behavior, some sexual content, language, drug content, drinking and nudity-all involving teens and has a 96-minute runtime.
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